GEAR 211 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Communication, Literature and Philosophy
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
GEAR 211
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This module aims to introduce students to analytic thinking and philosophizing via short readings and analysis of literary texts, art works, photography and cinema.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • explain the parallels between the history of philosophy and the history of communication/art/literature
  • compare the changes and developments in philosophical thinking with the changes and developments of the means and methods of communication
  • evaluate the role of literary texts in providing answers to the major philosophical questionscompare
  • compare the changes and developments in philosophical thinking with the changes and developments of the means and methods of communication provide
  • provide answers to the question of the extent to which the fundamental questions of Western philosophy, including being, subject and consciousness, have determined the practices of communication, art and literature
  • explain the links between different philosophical currents and the main analytic methods of the discipline of communications, including rhetoric, semiotics, discourse analysis and content analysis
  • explain the effects of binary oppositions that lie at the foundations of Western philosophy on the development of literature and arts in particular, and of communications and culture in generalrelate the creation of literary and artistic works to the knowledge derived from the ethical, aesthetical and political spheres of philosophy.
Course Content This course focuses on the historical trajectory of western philosophy in parallel to its relations particularly with literature and art, and generally with culture and communications.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Presentation and an overview of the course, course organization, requirements and methods of evaluation.
2 Essential Questions of Philosophy: Ancient Greece Clerk, ‘Ancient Philosophy, in Kenny, 1-53
3 Introduction to Philosophy of Modern Times ‘Descartes to Kant’, in Kenny, 107-193
4 Enlightenment, Modernity and Reason Umberto Eco, The Name of the Rose; ‘Descartes’ in Russell, 511-520, Umberto Eco, ‘The Return of the Middle Ages’ in Eco,Travels in Hyperreality, 59-86
5 Modernity, Science, Progress and Dangers Mary Shelley, Frankenstein. Descartes in Russell, 511-520
6 Discussion on the Consequences of Modernization 'Descartes to Kant' in Kenny, 107-193.
7 Consciousness, Identity and Freedom: Lord and Bondsman Orhan Pamuk, The White Castle. ‘Hegel’ in Kenny 201 -206.
8 Discussion on Lord/Bondsman and East/West Hegel’ in Kenny 201 -206. Hall, ‘The West and the Rest’ (Handout)
9 Ethics: Modern and Postmodern Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment. ‘Kantian Morality’, in Kenny, 190-192; ‘Nietzsche’, in Kenny 216-221
10 Modernity and Social Injustice John Steinbeck, Grapes of Wrath Movie: Germinal ‘ Marx and the Young Hegelians’ & ‘Capitalism and its Discontents’, Kenny, 304-309. Russell, Ch. XXVII. Karl Marx
11 Modernity, Power, Bureaucracy and Surveillance Franz Kafka ‘The Trial’ Movie ‘Kafka’ SEP ‘Weber’; SEP ‘Foucault’ (Handouts)
12 Rousseau: “Natural Man” and Degeneration Joseph Conrad, ‘Heart of Darkness’ Movie ‘Apocalypse Now’ Quinton ‘Rousseau’ in Kenny 329-332 Freud, ‘Civilization and Its Discontents’ (Handout)
13 Existentialism Albert Camus, The Stranger. Existentialism,SEP
14 Philosophy and Psyche Franz Kafka ‘Metamorphosis’ Yusuf Atılgan ‘Anayurt Oteli’ & Movie Modules on Freud (Handout) Kenny, .’Sigmound Freud’, pp. 343-350.
15 Review of the Semester
16 Revision

 

Course Textbooks

Robert C. Solomon and Kathleen M. Higgins, The Big Questions:  A Short Introduction to Philosophy.

Bertrand Russell, History of Western Philosophy,

Sir Anthony Kenny, An Illustrated Brief History of Western Philosophy.

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (SEP)

References

Umberto Eco, The Name of the Rose

Orhan Pamuk, The White Castle

Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment

Franz Kafka ‘The Trial’

Joseph Conrad, ‘Heart of Darkness’

Franz Kafka ‘Metamorphosis’

Yusuf Atılgan ‘Anayurt Oteli’

Albert Camus, The Stranger

John Steinbeck, Grapes of Wrath

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
30
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
2
60
Final / Oral Exam
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
3
70
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
1
30
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
15
5
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
20
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
2
10
Final / Oral Exam
    Total
163

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 Successfully applies theoretical and practical knowledge and skills in Culinary Arst and Management
2 Professionally applies artistic knowledge and skills that are required in the field of Culinary Arts
3 Carries best practices in terms of work and food security, safety and hygiene in food production
4 Appreciates, evaluates and makes decisions regarding to visual, textual and nutritional data with respect to food production and presentation
5 Recognizes and evaluates the impact of gastronomy on culture and society
6 Possesses visual thinking skils and effectively conveys visual concepts
7 Assumes responsibility for solving complex problems that may occur in the field of Culinary Arts and management, both individually and as a team member
8 Initiates culinary projects and can assume leadership for success
9 Critically evaluates the knowledge and skills possessed in Culinary Arts and Management, defines learning requirements and directs own learning
10 Informs individuals and organizations on topics related to Culinary Arts and Management and effectively conveys opinions in verbal or written ways
11 Shares opinions with experts or nonexperts by supporting them with quantitative and qualitative data
12 Possesses necessary knowledge and skills in relevant fields such as gastronomy, design and management and effectively applies them to the practice of Culinary Arts
13 Follows the developments in field and communicates with colleguages by fleuntly using a foreign language
14 Speaks a second foreign language in intermediate level
15 Effectively uses technological equipment related to the field
16 Possesses ethical values in the field of Culinary Arts and Management

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest