CLM 488 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Trends in Culinary History
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
CLM 488
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims to provide students knowledge and understanding about food and apply that knowledge to their academic and professional lives. This course will enhance students vision in food sector and will give the encourage to create future trends.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Evaluate the developments and trends in food sector
  • Explore individual food products and their functions in food sector on a global scale
  • Identify the future of food and it’s impacts.
  • Create new food trends for the future
  • Work with the team and find solutions to food problems of today.
Course Content Students are expected to research and develop new ideas for future trends in food sector.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
X
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 İntroduction
2 Why study food? Warren Belasco, “Introduction”, Food: The Key Concepts, New York: Berg, 2008, s. 1-13.
3 Back to Basics: Hunters, gatherers, and farmers Brian Hayden, “Hunting and Gathering”, Encyclopedia of Food and Culture içinde, Solomon H. Katz (ed.), vol. 2, NY: Thomson, 2003, s. 222-226.
4 Traditional food cultures Jeffrey M. Pilcher, Food in World History, “Chapter 1: The First World Cuisine”, NY, London: Routledge, 2006, s. 8-16.
5 Consequences of contact: trade, colonialism, and globalization. Jeffrey M. Pilcher, Food in World History, “Chapter 2: The Columbian Exchange”, NY. London: Routledge, 2006, s. 19-26.
6 Sugar and power Jeffrey M. Pilcher, Food in World History, “Chapter 3: Sugar, Spice, and Blood”, NY. London: Routledge, 2006, s. 27-33.
7 Midterm Exam
8 Aesthetics and connoisseurship Jean-Louis Flandrin, “Dietary Choices and Culinary Technique, 1500-1800” Food. A Culinary History from Antiquity to the Present içinde, Jean-Louis Flandrin ve Massimo Montanari (eds.), NY: Columbia University Press, 1999, s. 403-417.
9 Emergence of restaurants Jean-Robert Pitte, “The Rise of Restaurant”, Food. A Culinary History from Antiquity to the Present içinde, Jean-Louis Flandrin ve Massimo Montanari (eds.), NY: Columbia University Press, 1999, s. 471-480.
10 Famine and the modern history of hunger Cormac O Grada, The Great Irish Famine, “Chapter 2: The Great Hunger”, Macmillan, 1989, s. 39-64.
11 Food, nation, and identity Alison K. Smith, “National Cuisines”, The Oxford Handbook of Food History içinde, Jeffrey M. Pilcher (ed.), Oxford University Press, 2012, p. 444-460.
12 Globalization of food industry and fast food Jeffrey M. Pilcher, Food in World History, “Chapter 11 ve 12: The Green Revolution” ve “McDonaldization and its discontents”, NY. London: Routledge, 2006, p.100-112.
13 Organic and slow food alternatives Michael Pollan, The Omnivore’s Dilemma. A Natural History of Four Meals, “Chapter 8: All Flesh is Grass”, London: Penguin, 2006, p. 123-133.
14 Food science, cooking, molecular gastronomy Nicholas Kurti, Herve This-Benckhard, “Chemistry and Physics in the Kitchen”, Scientific American, 270 (4), s. 66-71.
15 Review of the semester
16 Final Exam

 

Course Textbooks

Warren Belasco, Food: the key concepts, New York: Berg, 2008. ISBN: 9781845206727

Jeffrey M. Pilcher, Food in World History, NY, London: Routledge, 2006, ISBN 0-415-31146-2

References

MINTZ S. Sweetness and Power: The Place of Sugar in Modern History, Penguin Books. 1986, ISBN 978-0140092332

Solomon H. Katz (ed), Encyclopedia of Food and Culture, three volumes, NY: Thomson, 2003, ISBN 978-0684805689

Jean-Louis Flandrin ve Massimo Montanari (eds.), Food. A Culinary History from Antiquity to the Present, NY: Columbia University Press, 1999, ISBN 9780231111546

Michael Pollan, The Omnivore’s Dilemma. A Natural History of Four Meals, London: Penguin, 2006, ISBN 1594200823 p. 123-133

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
25
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
25
Final / Oral Exam
1
40
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
3
60
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
1
40
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
2
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
30
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
20
Final / Oral Exam
1
20
    Total
150

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 Successfully applies theoretical and practical knowledge and skills in Culinary Arst and Management X
2 Professionally applies artistic knowledge and skills that are required in the field of Culinary Arts
3 Carries best practices in terms of work and food security, safety and hygiene in food production
4 Appreciates, evaluates and makes decisions regarding to visual, textual and nutritional data with respect to food production and presentation X
5 Recognizes and evaluates the impact of gastronomy on culture and society X
6 Possesses visual thinking skils and effectively conveys visual concepts X
7 Assumes responsibility for solving complex problems that may occur in the field of Culinary Arts and management, both individually and as a team member X
8 Initiates culinary projects and can assume leadership for success X
9 Critically evaluates the knowledge and skills possessed in Culinary Arts and Management, defines learning requirements and directs own learning X
10 Informs individuals and organizations on topics related to Culinary Arts and Management and effectively conveys opinions in verbal or written ways X
11 Shares opinions with experts or nonexperts by supporting them with quantitative and qualitative data X
12 Possesses necessary knowledge and skills in relevant fields such as gastronomy, design and management and effectively applies them to the practice of Culinary Arts X
13 Follows the developments in field and communicates with colleguages by fleuntly using a foreign language X
14 Speaks a second foreign language in intermediate level
15 Effectively uses technological equipment related to the field
16 Possesses ethical values in the field of Culinary Arts and Management X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest